Evandra Camara 1982 Article – Weight Training and Body Structure

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The effects of weight training on body structure has been a subject much bandied about in bodybuilding circles for the past three decades. These effects are the direct concern of this article, not the physiology of exercise, per se, or health related aspects. Modern physical culture has, from its earliest phases (starting roughly in the late 1940’s with the appearance of Steve Reeves) determined that the ideal male physique should sport wide shoulders, latissimus dorsi sweeping all the way down to a small and muscular waist and narrow hips, full thigh muscles, and large, diamond-shaped calves. Accordingly, bodybuilders have been urged all along to train in such a fashion as to mold their physiques along these lines.

The direction of training instruction found in the the muscle magazines and books has been changing in a continuum, from only tangential references to natural potential, to an increased awareness of this factor in connection with muscular development, to today’s strong emphasis on natural ability as a frame of reference by which the trainee must guide his bodybuilding efforts. The bodybuilding magazines of the 1950’s, particularly the more commercially-biased ones, pretty much pushed the hereditary factor aside, while emphasising the technique of specialization as a way of overcoming structural deficiencies.

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Weightlifting at the 1904 Olympics

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It was the first time that the Olympic Games were held outside of Europe and the first time they were held in an English speaking country. It was heralded as a monumental step in the internationalisation of the Olympic spirit and it was prompted as such.

Unfortunately, the reality of the 1904 St. Louis Olympics proved to be anything but. Owing both to the Russo-Japanese War and the sheer difficulty in sending athletes to the United States from Europe, the 1904 Games were largely bereft of elite athletes. Nevertheless, perhaps owing to the determined attitude of the organisers, the Games continued regardless.

Whether this was a blessing or a curse for the sport of weightlifting is up to the reader to decide.

Today’s post examines the re-emergence of weightlifting at the 1904 Olympic Games. The sport had been part of the inaugural games in Athens in 1896 but had failed to appear at the Paris showing four years later. As a sport still in its infancy, weightlifting depended on international showings to improve its popularity. While the first international weightlifting competition was held in London in 1891, the Olympic games five years later had seen significantly more media interest in the event.

Weightlifting in many ways needed genuine Olympic interest to attract more to the sport.

The Difference Between Powerlifting and Bodybuilding

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The following post comes from the incredibly talented writer and personal trainer Carole Klein. It details both the differences and similarities between bodybuilding and powerlifting and is undoubtedly a great read for beginning and dedicated gym goers alike.

Many people think that powerlifting and bodybuilding are interchangeable terms, but while both offer a great workout, they’re not the same thing. They differ in regards to their goals and how they measure success. While both use strength and endurance, they have a different effect on the body as well. Here, we’ll break down the differences and similarities between the two.

Powerlifting and Bodybuilding: What’s the Difference?

Weston Price and Bodybuilding

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Earlier this week, Physical Culture Study was lucky enough to chat with Sally Fallon Morrell, the President of the Weston A. Price Foundation. For those readers who are unaware of the Foundation’s work, the WAPF has spent nearly two decades educating people on healthy dietary practices.

Advocating the consumption of saturated fats, raw fullfat dairy and a host of other supposedly ‘unhealthy’ foods, the WAPF can be seen as a sane voice in a world of low-fat fanatics. More recently, the Foundation has spearheaded the move to make raw milk sales legal into all 50 American States. With 42 down and only 8 more to go, few would bet against them.

So without further ado, check out a rather enlightening discussion with Sally.

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In both the bodybuilding and fitness community more generally it is commonplace to see diets that are high in lean cuts of meat, carbs and low in fat.

How does the Western Price diet differ from such approaches and what do these approaches lack?

Lessons to be Learned from Strongmen, the Modern Titans

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Our latest post comes from the wonderful and talented Samantha Olivier from Ripped.me. We’re delighted to have Samantha featured on the site again and know you’ll enjoy her latest piece.

Some things never grow old, or they even age like wine. Strongmen rise as champions in the most formidable arenas and forge their muscles in the fires of most astonishing physical activity. These behemoths have proved that some rules are set in stone, and that following them brings stellar results. They look as if nothing can stand in their way, ready to take down a mountain with bare hands if need be. So, what is there to be learned from these professionals who always seem to perform to the best of their ability?

Sandow and Stout: An Irish Story

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The Irish alcohol industry has, at its core, always been particularly adept at marketing. From Whiskey to Guinness, sellers have used a variety of inventive advertisements to flog their wares to a thirsty public. Illustrating this is today’s post about a strange encounter between Eugen Sandow, a Prussian born strongman and Murphy’s Stout based in County Cork, Ireland.

The above image depicting Sandow lifting a horse overhead was one of many used by the brewing firm in the early years of the twentieth-century to promote their stout.

So how did Murphy’s come to secure the image rights of one of the world’s most popular figures? The answer seems to have come down to sheer serendipity.

6 Truths About Modern Weight Loss Programs

 

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When you have a keen interest in the history of fitness techniques, it gives you an interesting perspective on the more modern trends. They come and go like the seasons, and, if this blog is still going in thirty years, no doubt I’ll be writing about their impact – or lack of. That said, no matter what fitness plan or weight loss regime you are doing, some things will always remain the same. Here are six truths about modern fitness and weight loss programs.

A Helpful Guide For Boosting Post-Workout Recovery

It can be easy to get carried away with pumping yourself up for your big workout. But some people forget to take the right steps after a workout. Sometimes, what you do post-workout is the most important thing for getting results. Since mass gaining mostly occurs while you sleep, you want your body to be primed for recovery.

Focusing on recovery also helps to prevent injuries and gives you more energy for training the next day. There are a few simple steps you can take after your workout to boost recovery. Here are some of the things you’ll want to do.