The History of the Mind-Muscle Connection

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“What puts you over the top? It is the mind that actually creates the body, it is the mind that really makes you work out for four or five hours a day, it is the mind that visualizes what the body ought to look like as the finished product.”

Arnold Schwarzenegger

The mind-muscle connection? That’s what Arnold talked about right?

Well yes but he wasn’t the only one as I discovered recently when going through some old material written by Peary Rader.

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History of the Squat…Kind of

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Bench Press, Deadlift, Squat. What could be easier than that? For most people it makes up the brunt of their training programme, yet we rarely stop and ask where did these exercises come from? I mean after all, if you’re going to spend countless hours in the squat rack, at some point you should question how the Squat became popularized. Right?

So who did invent the Squat?

Fitness in the Classical Age

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Were people as concerned with being fit and healthy two thousand years ago?

The need to be fit isn’t a new phenomenon. In fact two thousand years ago, the the ability to run fast, lift heavy things and punch hard was arguably much more important than it is today. For many civilisations it was matter of life and death. Take for example the ancient Greeks who prioritized health and fitness. For the Greeks being in tip-top shape was a necessity for the sake of their Empires. Back then, fitness was a backbone of military strength.

Are You WW2 Strong?

SoldierThe Second World War re-introduced the Western world back to the importance of health and fitness. The inter-war years were characterised by concerns that Europeans and Americans were no longer as strong as they once were. In the midst of war, Leaders became concerned. Victory in the battlefield could only be achieved through victory in the gymnasium. In 1942, the US Army introduced a formal fitness test to the incoming troops, with this in mind.

For the first time in American history, troops would be put through their places in several exercises to determine their value to Uncle Sam.

The men of 1942 had to do it. How would you have fared?

The Protein Myth

SONY DSCType protein and bodybuilding into Google and chances are you’ll be told your not eating enough protein to build muscle. The bodybuilding and health industry have themselves up around the twin pillars of marketing and selling. The key claim for advertisers is that you need protein and you’re not getting enough as is. Nowadays the health enthusiast is bombarded with advertisements for protein powders, bars and cookies. Many of these products are simply sugared candies with a scoop of protein added in but we as consumers buy the message that protein is the be all and end all of muscle building.

How have we ended up here in a world where diets recommending upwards of 300 grams of protein are the norm?

Cornflakes, Granola and the fight against Masturbation

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All of us have done. We’ve run down the stairs in our pyjamas, headed straight for the kitchen and once there, it’s cereal time. Out comes the bowl, the milk and the prize possession, Kellogg Cornflakes. What may be a simple morning ritual for us was at one time a serious health remedy for Dr. John Kellogg, the inventor of Kellogg Cornflakes.

For Dr. Kellogg a healthy diet led to a healthy lifestyle and in line with this way of thinking, Kellogg Cornflakes and Granola were invented to help curb what Dr. Kellogg saw as an unhealthy habit of masturbation in America’s youth. Yes that’s right, one of our favorite cereals was invented as masturbation repellent.

So why was masturbation such a hot topic for the cereal king?