Tag: muscle gain

George A. Baselice, ‘GIGANTIC ARMS! The One Arm Per Day Blast For Bigger Arms’, Planet Muscle (Volume 5, Number 1, 2002)

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Have you ever tried the professional bodybuilder one-day arm blasting programs? I hope maybe some of you have heard of these and tried them. Primarily because I’d hate to think that I am the only goof who can spend an entire day training my arms!

Now, some of these are downright nutty programs. Most of the methods were “developed” and occasionally promoted in some of the muscle magazines back in the 50’s and 60’s, and some trainers such as Charles Poliquin have refined them a bit today.

At any rate, in most of them, you actually perform arm exercises every half-hour and every few hours you eat proteins. I tried one program and I mean I went from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. doing arm exercises. Don’t ask me what I was thinking! (Or not thinking as the case may be.)

Did I gain the 1/2″ on my arms, five days after completing this particular program, as the varied and sundry past articles claimed I would? Unfortunately, no. Did my arms shrink for the first 24 hours after this workout as most of the article also claimed they would? Unfortunately, yes!

Jay Jacobsen, ‘Carbohydrates Are Not The Devil! All Aboard The Carbohydrate-Glycemic Train’, Planet Muscle (March – April 2003)

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Carbohydrates… those omnipresent fruits, yams, grains and vegetables, are older than mankind. In recorded history, it appears that the Egyptian culture was the first to ‘mill’ their high-energy grain, removing fiber, as well as much of the nutrition. Bingo—mankind had its first refined carbohydrates.

Sugar was first introduced into Europe around 700 AD when Arabian armies brought sugar cane from Northern Africa. Sugar then slithered into Spain, Sicily, and the surrounding areas of the Mediterranean. Sugar was known as “white gold” and was a luxury only the extremely wealthy could afford. With the exploration of the New World, sugar trade became more profitable, and even Christopher Columbus brought sugar cane cuttings to the Americas.

By the time of the American Industrial Revolution, the sugar refining business blossomed. Around 1900, the first sugar-in-the-box product was introduced to the American consumer. Today, the average sugar consumption in America is a mind-blowing per capita consumption from all sources of 160 lbs. per year, 40 teaspoons per day.

The opinions regarding sugar, particularly among athletes and weight conscious individuals, have violently changed since 1900! Instead of white gold some even call sugar white death. For example, If you are a devout Dr. Atkins fan you probably think that eating carbs is analogous to driving drunk (maybe ketogenic stupor driving). But, are carbs the most horrific poison ever created – or are they more of a missing link to huge gains in energy, strength, and a diesel physique?

Vince Gironda, ‘Workouts And Body Rhythm’, IronMan Magazine, (November 1983)

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Question: 

You seem to write a great deal about exercise techniques, yet I have noticed that much of it is in fact conflicting advice.

I have been bodybuilding for ten years now, before that I did six years of weightlifting. I still do not know what is the best system to use.

Vince, how do you justify your writing when you even go so far as to contradict your own advice?

Answer:

I once wrote an article entitled, Muscle Confusion, which was not understood by many. Readers actually made fun of it. I will now attempt to explain in more detail the essence of that article. The following is dedicated to those of little faith and to the ones who resist change.

Jackson Bowling, Steroids Good or Bad? (Muscular Developement, September 1968)

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Bodybuilders and athletes alike are hearing more and more about the “new” tissue drugs and anabolic steroids, but down to earth facts and information has been hard to come by.

Just what are these steroids ? Are they harmful ? Do they really work the miracles some claim ? These are but a few of the many questions that more and more weight trainees are asking, and this article hopes to give the answers in plain, every day terms.

Why Aren’t People Doing The “Old” Exercises Anymore?

As time goes on, there are more and more “ways” to exercise. If you look in the gym the next time you go, how many different variations are there on what are the core exercises each time? From boxercise to funky pump, insanity to CrossFit, we are being exposed to so much more different types of exercises than 20 years ago. On top of that, we have so many different diets to choose from that we are just plain confused about which one is best for us. Does the paleo diet work better because of the lack of carbs, or does it just make you plain tired because you haven’t replenished your glycogen stores? When it comes down to it, the basics have always been there, and they worked for everyone, from Eugen Sandow to Arnold Schwarzenegger, or from Nikki Fuller to Bev Francis. They never spoke of isolating one small muscle and working that until they were blue in the face. It always came from the basics of biomechanics and “old fashioned” weight training programs.

Bradley J. Steiner’s 1988 Hardgainer Diet

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Discussed previously on this website, Bradley Steiner was once the go to man for hardgainers seeking to gain weight and muscle mass. Focused on both exercise and correct nutrition, Steiner’s advice in the 1980s is as timely now as it was back then. For all those muscle fanatics struggling to expand their chest size, the below advice will no doubt be of interest.