Guest Post A Brief History of Dietary Supplements

 

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Almost everyone at one time or another has taken dietary supplements. Some people take them to obtain food nutrients lacking in their diet, others take them to compliment or derive more benefits from their food intake, and many people take them because their doctor recommends it.

What then are dietary supplements? Are they safe and do they really work as advertised? Are there any government regulations over what constitutes dietary supplements?

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The First Pre-Workout Supplements

 

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A worrying trend for many within the Iron Game is the sheer dependency exhibited by trainees and their pre-workout supplements. Gone are the days of Vince Gironda and Don Howorth who trained in almost complete silence. Nowadays the gym is a veritable dance floor filled with techno music and brightly coloured drinks. To save lifter’s ego, the latter are given names like ‘Crazed’, ‘Jacked’ or ‘Mr.Hyde’.

Today’s post is not an attempt to insult those of us who rely on preworkouts to train, but rather to discuss some of the milder and arguably more sustainable preworkouts used by the trainees of old. What did they use and why? Furthermore, can we begin to wean ourselves off the current sugar and caffeine filled drinks and move towards the old-school methods?

Abe Goldberg (1951) Article -Low Back Power

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Written in the 1950s but containing information relevant to the modern gym goer, the following article by Abe Goldberg will be sure to interest both those seeking to bring up their squat numbers and bend over without significant discomfort. A nice follow on from our article on the reverse hyperextension, Goldberg’s exercises will hit your posterior chain like nothing else.

Enjoy!

Guest Post: The History of Whey Protein for Bodybuilding

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If there is perhaps one supplement that is synonymous with bodybuilding, it’s whey protein.

Whey protein is an important element in any bodybuilder’s regimen. To achieve serious muscle gains, many bodybuilders turn to whey protein as a crucial post-workout supplement. Whey provides the necessary building blocks in the building and retention of muscle.

After all, the role of any bodybuilder is to generate more muscle mass.

This article looks at whey protein and its supplementary purpose for a bodybuilding program. It will examine the history of whey as well as beneficial ways of integrating whey into your workout program if you haven’t already done so.

The History of the Olympic Barbell

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A friend of mine recently made a very serious and from my perspective funny discovery. Having spent months training in a University gym replete with shiny new barbells, he decided to join me in my own gym for a catch up and quick training session. Ever the opportunist, he decided it was ‘Chest Day’ and first up was the Bench Press.

Engaging in some light hearted, at least he thought it was light hearted, joking we began loading up the plates. As his outbursts began to reach a crescendo, I made my way to the water fountain for some peace of mind. Hearing a squeal I turned around to see my friend pinned under the bar at a weight he assured me was ‘nothing.’ Thankfully his pride was the only thing injured and next time round he had me spotting him. The result? Still nothing.

Vince Gironda, ‘Workouts And Body Rhythm’, IronMan Magazine, (November 1983)

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Question: 

You seem to write a great deal about exercise techniques, yet I have noticed that much of it is in fact conflicting advice.

I have been bodybuilding for ten years now, before that I did six years of weightlifting. I still do not know what is the best system to use.

Vince, how do you justify your writing when you even go so far as to contradict your own advice?

Answer:

I once wrote an article entitled, Muscle Confusion, which was not understood by many. Readers actually made fun of it. I will now attempt to explain in more detail the essence of that article. The following is dedicated to those of little faith and to the ones who resist change.

George F. Jowett, ‘The Standard That Determines the Ideal Shape’, The Key to Muscle and Might (c. 1925)

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There is no doubt in my mind that Eugene Sandow’s rise to fame was due more to the symmetrical shapeliness of his enviable body than to the difficulty of feats of strength he performed. Generally speaking, there are two things which will always impress the mind of the body culturist, shape and strength. With strength, we have already dealt.

Therefore, we will now direct out attention to the value of shapeliness, and the influence it has upon our mind and body. Oh yes, it has a great influence upon the mind. The next time you visit an art gallery notice the quiet reverence that is displayed by the art lovers, as they move from one picture to another. The serene beauty of the pictures permeates the whole atmosphere, leaving the beholders in silent wonder. I have a great friend who is a wonderful artist, and he often makes sketches of the body in varied postures, which he brings to me for scrutiny. On one of his visits he said to me, “I can always tell whether the drawings meet with your approval or not. Not by what you say, as much as how little you say. Your eyes are always drawn to the pictures you like best, and I have noticed that you have sometimes been so enraptured that you did not hear me speak to you.” He was quite right. Pictures of the body beautiful, correctly translated, never weary me. I can feast my eyes upon them for hours at a time. This rather contradicts the statement that, familiarity with the most beautiful objects, breeds contempt. For twenty-five years I have lived in the atmosphere of beautiful bodies, and I am still as enthusiastic as I was when I first commenced my studies.