The History of the Trap Bar

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A piece of equipment that has become increasingly common in recent years is the trap bar, that hexagonal device which has become the bane of many a lifter. An easy way to build up the quads and lower back, the trap bar first came into my consciousness when i began lifting in the early 2000s. An odd device, the thing kicked my ass as I attempted a meagre deadlift.

Since then, we’ve come to better terms to the extent that I began to wonder where this device came from. What was its original purpose? And how did it end up on a gym floor in Dublin? A series of questions that has led to today’s post.

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Guest Post: The Greatest Genetics? The Case of Flex Wheeler

Kenneth Flex Wheeler is often called the “Sultan of Symmetry” and known for being a living legend who has one of the best physiques to ever grace the IFBB stage as he has the widest back and shoulders among all bodybuilder competitors. In spite of muscle mass size, definition and proportion, Mr. Olympia judges have commonly been impressed with his muscle size than with body proportion, that`s why Flex Wheeler is justly considered as the greatest bodybuilder who has never won the Mr. Olympia, but who won Arnold Classic four times!

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Today Flex Wheeler is the 52-year old icon of bodybuilding who likes to amaze and make happy his fans announcing his comeback for the Mr. Olympia 2017.

Bill Starr, Gaining Weight The Natural Way (1993 article)

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It was the first really warm day of spring. The trees and shrubs displayed tiny buds, but the insects and crawling creatures were not yet out in force and, best of all, the poison ivy was still dormant. It was the ideal time to hike through the woodlands of the Susquehanna State Park. I tracked down the source of a small stream, watched a six-foot blacksnake slither up the limbs of a sapling in order to do some serious sunbathing, and observed a dozen adventuresome canoeists guide their crafts over the white water of Deer Creek.

Eat like a Saxon!

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Those acquainted with the history of Physical Culture will no doubt recall the Saxon brothers, a travelling troupe of German strongmen who performed at the turn of the twentieth century. Blessed with remarkable physiques, the trio’s mighty strength was undoubtedly aided by their healthy appetite for food and drink. In fact, as today’s brief post shows, the trio consumed a gargantuan amount of food even by today’s standards.

According to Kurt Saxon, who acted as the trio’s chef on the road, a normal day’s consumption for each individual man was as follows:

Great Foods For Natural Weight Loss

Shifting those stubborn, unsightly pounds has been a subject of preoccupation for the health conscious for centuries. Indeed, an entire market has arisen around our need to keep wobbliness at bay, despite the demands of modern living. After all, with many of us working longer hours than ever before in jobs that traditionally require us to be bound to desks, a perfect flat tummy can be hard to attain.

Guest Post: Weight Loss Diets of The Twentieth Century

People often think of diet as a relatively modern trend that became popular in the 1980s. However, the humanity has been struggling to lose weight for centuries. The idea of dieting as an effective method for achieving this has been around at least since the twentieth century, when the first literature that gave weight-loss advice appeared.

In this article, we are going to review the history of diets in the twentieth century that revolutionized the way people looked at nutrition.

Steve Michalik’s Training Diary from 1968

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How bodybuilding champions train is an area of intense interest for muscle fanatics the world over. How many sets, how many reps and how intensely? What makes them great?

Seeking to satisfy demands, muscle magazines often publish polished workout routines written by the Champions. Yet nothing compares to the first article, making today’s post on Steve Michalik’s 1968 training diary just so fascinating. In it we see Steve’s hopes for the future regarding the stage and also his thoughts on training poundages an intensity. A gem of a find that I stumbled across on Dave Draper’s excellent bodybuilding website and forum.

You can check out the training diary below.