Guest Post: A Short history of JAZZercise

People dance when they feel good.

People workout because they want to feel good, to have a good look.

What do these two activities have in common? They both make people feel better about themselves. They both provide a sense of wellness.

From ancient times, when people were physically working every day, fighting, or hunting to survive, people were running, exercising and this would keep them in good shape, having good health. Nowadays people workout because they don’t do any physical activity and they have to lose weight. Sedentary life is not suitable for health as many diseases can occur: gaining weight, back problems, slow metabolism, constant fatigue feeling, and many others.

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Guest Post: Let’s Talk About the History of Ketogenic Diet

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If you are someone who has failed miserably at controlling your cravings for those cheesy treats that melt in your mouth and that juicy fried chicken but still want to shed some pounds, Keto is the answer to your problem. Keto has recently emerged as the buzz word in fitness circuits and many fitness freaks who have adapted to keto lifestyle are all praises about its results. Keto diet focuses on triggering the production of ketones in our body and requires adhering to a high fat low carb diet, where the carbohydrate proportion should not be more than 5 percent.

The History of the Glute Ham Raise

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Owing to the inquisitive nature of a PCS reader, I’ve finally gotten my act together, or at least come close enough to some semblance of normality, to go down the rabbit hole once again. The topic of todays post, is the rather more niche but nevertheless effective Glute Ham Raise (GHR) machine.

Having spent years devotedly using reverse hyperextensions and 45 degree back extensions, my own relationship with the Glute Ham Raise only began in the last twelve months. Since then I’ve made a point of trying as many different alternatives as possible. As is so often the case, I became too engrossed in using the machine that I forgot to look into its history. An email this month asking me about the GHR finally set me straight.

So without further ado we’ll crack into the history of the GHR. What is it? Who invented it and how did it become so damn popular?

Arthur Saxon, ‘Routine of Training’, The Development of Physical Power (London, 1906)

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WITH regard to the routine of training, I again repeat, my idea is not to develop muscle at the expense of either health or strength. It is really impossible for me to prescribe special exercises with fixed time limits for same, and fixed days for each individual who may ready this book, as we are all possessed of different constitutions and staminal power, but roughly speaking it will be found correct in most instances to practice twice per week, and at such practices I advise that on each lift you commence with fairly light weights, and gradually increase the weight of same. Taking the double-handed lift, if your lift is about 200 pounds commence at 100 pounds, and with this light weight press overhead, then add 20 pounds and press again, and so on, until you are compelled to jerk the weight. Proceed until you reach your limit, then try another lift, say the snatch, commencing low and working up to your highest poundage. Surely this method of prac- tice is better than to attempt, as most English and American weight-lifters do, their heaviest bell right off the reel. As usual, they fail, and then get in reality no practice at all, only making their position worse, instead of better. Of course, to practice this way shot-loading bar bells would be a nuisance. The most up-to-date bells on the market for weight-lifting practice, in my opinion, are disc-loading bells. With these disc-loading bells one may have a weight as low as 20 pounds or as high as 400 pounds, and one bell would be sufficient for any number of lifters. The same plates used on the long bar may also be used on short bars for dumb-bells.

5 Craziest Diets: Ancient Diets that People Have Forgotten

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Most modern diets include the Keto (or Ketosis) diet, and water diets (where you only drink water for prolonged periods of time). Ketosis works very well, and it’s ingenious; give it a look when you have the time – it might surprise you! But what are some of the weirdest diets that people in our history have given us? Are there diets crazier than the infamous water diet (it’s inherently dangerous to intake only water as your body won’t get everything it needs to function properly)? Did our ancestors also have a fast metabolism diet?

As a matter of fact, there are. Some of the diets on this list are downright crazy, while others might seem genius. The verdict on each of them is up to you, but they’re pretty wild! Here are the 5 craziest ancient diets that people have forgotten.

Bob Gajda’s Peripheral Heart Action (PHA) Training

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One point that always fascinates me about training is the sheer diversity one finds when it comes to training systems, exercises and training philosophies. What works for one trainee can prove pointless to another. No matter how good the programme, it often has to be tailored towards the individual, and indeed, we often find that the most successful trainees when it comes to bodybuilding have devised or used workouts advantageous to themselves.

Today’s post is a case in point. Titled ‘Peripheral Heart Action’ or PHA training, this form of exercise has come to be associated with Bob Gajda, the 1966 Mr. America Winner. Counting a host of proponents, including Charles Poliquin, PHA training is a rather interesting combination of circuit, strength and hypertrophy designed with bodybuilding in mind. That being the case, today’s post seeks to answer three simple questions. What is PHA Training and who invented it? Why did it come to be associated with Gajda and finally how can it be used for the modern trainee?

Push-Ups – Their history, Beneficial Effects, Types and Potential Risks

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What Do You Need to Know About Push-Ups Before You Try Them?

Introduction

There is not a man on earth, nor woman for that matter, that has not been introduced to the context of push-ups before. Perhaps you have even tried to do a push-up in your life just to see what it is all about! Well, this amazing exercise has been true to its meaning and it has introduced success into any person’s exercising plan who has been motivated enough to perform this exercise regularly and properly. But the truth is that any exercise, including something as simple as push-up is, brings potential risks to your body if you are not trained properly to do this exercise. So what we what to do today, is introduce you to the context of push-ups and share basic information regarding what a push-up is, who has thought about it first, its potential beneficial effects as well as risks. If you are looking to introduce push-ups as a regular exercise into your exercise routine, then we look forward to informing you more about this great exercise!

George F. Jowett, The Truth About Exercise (c. 1925)

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It takes all kinds of people to make a world, but some we often feel should be given an island, to make a world of their own. There are people who apparently are born with the pessimistic germ in their systems. They just cannot help taking a contrary view of the situation. You find them everywhere, and antagonistic to the popular beliefs of life, law and religion. I agree that the major part of their criticism is destructive rather than constructive, but why worry about them if you know you are right. You may say, “Look at the harm they do.” But I do not believe that. Like attracts like is my belief. Some people prefer to believe that black is white, so let them believe it. We have the same spirit to contend with in teaching the valuable precepts of physical training.

I happened to know a man who had an argumentative belief that exercise was harmful; he accosted a heart specialist on the question, with whom I am familiar. The specialist informed him that the causes of cardiac conditions were reduced to four, none of which were caused by exercise. The only time sports or exercise are liable to injure the heart are when the heart is out of condition. Then anything would injure it. More often bad eating, but rarely right exercise, which is constructive. The other man replied that just the same he believed exercise hurts the heart. Now a wall would have to fall on such a man before he would believe it had fallen. And, as an angel could not convert such a person, why worry about it?