Category: Basics

Guest Post: How to Stay Fit After 50

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The old saying goes that you are as old as you feel. This is most definitely true in spirit, but when it comes to your body – your actual age starts creeping up on you pretty fast. After your 50th birthday, the changes become more rapid and a lot harsher. This is exactly the reason to get ahead of the curve and start paying proper attention to what you eat and how you treat your body. Start scheduling regular checkups and once you make an exercise plan stick to it no matter what.

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Guest Post: How to Pack on Muscle and Lose Fat with Minimal Effort

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Our latest post comes from the wonderful and talented Samantha Olivier from Ripped.me. We’re delighted to have Samantha featured on the site again and know you’ll enjoy her latest piece.

There are about 600 muscles in the human body, making up between a third and a half of its total bodyweight. They help us move, hold us up, and help bind us together. The way we treat them determines whether they’ll grow or wither, so they need our constant attention. How to build muscle and lose fat at the same time, you may wonder? With the right combination of exercise, nutrition, and sleep.

Cool Tools To Help You Track Your Fitness

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Photo: Pixabay

If you have embarked on a healthy 2017, you will no doubt be trying to improve your fitness as well as your health. As improving fitness is a very long and winding road to go down, you will need something to help you document this journey. It’s a good idea to track your fitness for various levels. Firstly, it will help you stay motivated, as it can show you just how far you have come. But mainly, you need to track your fitness so that you can make sure that all your workouts and routines are working as they should be. So how exactly do you keep on track? Here are some tools that can help you track everything.

The History of American Powerlifting

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Perhaps the most popular form of training for modern gym goers, powerlifting is nevertheless a relatively recent phenomena. Indeed, while bodybuilding and Olympic Weightlifting date to the start of the twentieth-century, it was not until the 1960s that the art of lifting incredibly heavy things was formally recognised.

Today’s article thus looks at the birth of American powerlifting, from it’s humble beginnings, past it’s first competitions and into the age of international contests. A story of strength, politics and fun.

Staying Safe As A Cyclist On The Road

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(Image Credit)

It’s not secret that the roads we use are incredibly dangerous. This danger increases significantly when you sit yourself on a bike. You don’t have protection from impacts, and you don’t have the power to escape accidents. Especially inner city, cyclists have to deal with near-misses on a regular basis. Thankfully, accidents are lessening as drivers become more aware.

The History of the Front Squat

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Having briefly discussed the history of the back squat some time ago, efforts were made over the past few days to create a similar account for the front squat. Sadly, perhaps owing to the popularity of its older brother, histories of the front squat are virtually non-existent as many writers seem to take its existence as a simple fact.

Nevertheless it is clear that all exercises are created at some point in history and with this in mind, I went trawling through old Physical Culture magazines and a selection of secondary books on the topic.

Forgotten Exercises: The Roman Column

While many exercises, such as the squat, appear to be timeless in the lore of exercise history, there are many movements and machines that fall away with the sands of time.

Today’s post looks at the Roman Column, an inverted strongman exercise created in the mid-eighteenth century and used by famous performers such as Eugen Sandow and his mentor, Professor Atilla.

What is the Roman Column?

Bodybuilding Pioneers: Launceston Elliot

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Born in Scotland in 1874, Launceston Elliot is perhaps more famous for his contributions to the world of weightlifting than bodybuilding. His fame in the weightlifting community, as readers of this blog will be aware, came from his gold weightlifting medal at the 1896 Athens Olympics. Similarly the course of his athletic career saw the powerful Scotsman set and break, a number of weightlifting records.

Nevertheless, Elliot’s achievements were far reaching as he appears to have been the first man to win a physique contest in Great Britain. While much has been made of Sandow’s Great Competition (1901) and its role in furthering bodybuilding’s status amongst the general public, it is arguable that without Elliot’s precedent, Sandow’s idea may never have come to the fore.