Tag: Peary Rader

Peary Rader, Calf Specialisation (1946)

s-l300

Since the calves are perhaps the hardest part of the body for most bodybuilders to develop properly, and since they usually lag behind the rest of the body we will give them our attention here.

Advertisements

Peary Rader’s Magic Circle

magiccircle.jpg

Loved and despised in equal measure, the squat has long been the iron game’s go to exercise for maximum leg development. A cornerstone of most trainee’s leg routines, there is certainly no doubting the exercise’s popularity.

Yet despite the fact that the back squat in particular has enjoyed a decades long dominance amongst gym rats, this does not mean that it’s position has not been challenged. Indeed for every man and woman who swear by the traditional squat, chances are you’ll find many more who curse it.

Owing to individual body mechanics, many individuals have found it difficult to perform the back squat with the form necessary to produce maximum development. This is not a new problem either as today’s post attests.

Is the Mr. America Contest an Athletic Event ?

victory_podium

The following article, written in Peary Rader’s Ironman magazine in 1964, deals with a question most bodybuilding fans have to answer. Namely, whether or not the pursuit of muscle building can be viewed as a sport or athletic event in its own right.What differentiates Rader’s time from now is that back then, physique competitors were also expected to perform weightlifting feats as part of the competition. A stipulation one could hardly think possible in today’s Mr. Olympia competitions. Nevertheless the article raises and answers some interesting points from one of the industry’s most respected figures. Enjoy!

The controversy over phyisque contests has become one of the touchiest events you can discuss and perhaps for this reason we should keep quiet, and yet we have some convictions about this thing that we feel ought to be presented. It has been some years since we discussed the problems of phyisque contests in Iron Man and perhaps it is time to bring it up again since, instead of lessening, the difficulties seem to be increasing.

Antony Ditillo Training Routines

ditillo1-640x437

Having previously discussed physical culture icon, Peary Rader on this site, it seems only fitting to look at some of Anthony Ditillo’s proven workout routines. Ditillo wrote for Rader’s Ironman magazine for nearly two decades covering everything from diet advice to competition specialisation. Although now deceased, Ditillo’s legacy lives on in the thousands of strength coaches he inspired, including the controversial Charles Poliquin.

Although Ditillo wrote numerous workouts during his career, we have decided to look at some of his more popular works for strength athletes, those looking to bulk up and those just wanting to look better naked. Regardless of your training preference, you’ll be sure to find something to suit you here.

Peary Rader’s Abbreviated Mass Routine

 

Screenshot 2016-01-26 19.45.23

Previously on this site we have looked at the influence of Peary Rader on both bodybuilding and weightlifting. Editor of Ironman magazine for several decades, Rader was influential in the training of thousands of men during the course of his career and more importantly, his focus tended to be on ‘the common man’ as opposed to the bodybuilding giants of his era.

With this in mind, today’s post details several of Rader’s abbreviated routines from the mid 20th century. Abbreviated routines centred around compound exercises aimed at maximising as much muscle growth as possible for busy individuals.

So who would benefit from such programmes?

The History of the Mind-Muscle Connection

1330-fitandcrop-484x305

“What puts you over the top? It is the mind that actually creates the body, it is the mind that really makes you work out for four or five hours a day, it is the mind that visualizes what the body ought to look like as the finished product.”

Arnold Schwarzenegger

The mind-muscle connection? That’s what Arnold talked about right?

Well yes but he wasn’t the only one as I discovered recently when going through some old material written by Peary Rader.

History of the Squat…Kind of

arnold-squats

Bench Press, Deadlift, Squat. What could be easier than that? For most people it makes up the brunt of their training programme, yet we rarely stop and ask where did these exercises come from? I mean after all, if you’re going to spend countless hours in the squat rack, at some point you should question how the Squat became popularized. Right?

So who did invent the Squat?