Tag: Diet

Guest Post: Let’s Talk About the History of Ketogenic Diet

ketogenic-diet-vancouver-2

If you are someone who has failed miserably at controlling your cravings for those cheesy treats that melt in your mouth and that juicy fried chicken but still want to shed some pounds, Keto is the answer to your problem. Keto has recently emerged as the buzz word in fitness circuits and many fitness freaks who have adapted to keto lifestyle are all praises about its results. Keto diet focuses on triggering the production of ketones in our body and requires adhering to a high fat low carb diet, where the carbohydrate proportion should not be more than 5 percent.

5 Craziest Diets: Ancient Diets that People Have Forgotten

5 Craziest diet ancient diet that people have forgotten-1.jpg

Most modern diets include the Keto (or Ketosis) diet, and water diets (where you only drink water for prolonged periods of time). Ketosis works very well, and it’s ingenious; give it a look when you have the time – it might surprise you! But what are some of the weirdest diets that people in our history have given us? Are there diets crazier than the infamous water diet (it’s inherently dangerous to intake only water as your body won’t get everything it needs to function properly)? Did our ancestors also have a fast metabolism diet?

As a matter of fact, there are. Some of the diets on this list are downright crazy, while others might seem genius. The verdict on each of them is up to you, but they’re pretty wild! Here are the 5 craziest ancient diets that people have forgotten.

Vilhjalmur Stefansson’s All Meat Diet Part Two

stefansson3

Yesterday we had the first of Vihjalmur Stefansson’s amazing account of his all meat diet. Today we look at the second installment.

I

Now that the experiments in diet which Karsen Anderson and I undertook at Bellevue Hospital have been accepted by the medical world, it is difficult to realize that there could have been such a storm of excitement about the announcement of the plan, such a violent clash of opinions, such near unanimity to the prediction of dire results.

Vilhjalmur Stefansson’s All Meat Diet Part One

 stefansson3

Vilhjamur Stefannsson was a man of note for several reasons. Born in Canada in the late 1800s, the would be explorer discovered new lands and continental shelves, all the while publishing a host of books, articles and journals. Between 1906 and 1918, he went on three expeditions into Canadian and Alaskan Arctic, with the duration of each trip varying from sixteen months to five years. During these years he observed the dietary habits of the local Inuits, whose primary food source was meat. 

In 1935 Stefannsson published his experiences in Harper’s Monthly over two articles detailing the all meat diet he encountered. Below is Stefannsson’s first article.

I

In 1906 I went to the Arctic with the food tastes and beliefs of the average American. By 1918, after eleven years as an Eskimo among Eskimos, I had learned things which caused me to shed most of those beliefs. Ten years later I began to realize that what I had learned was going to influence materially the sciences of medicine and dietetics. However, what finally impressed the scientists and converted many during the last two or three years, was a series of confirmatory experiments upon myself and a colleague performed at Bellevue Hospital, New York City, under the supervision of a committee representing several universities and other organizations.

Guest Post: The History of the Paleo Diet

3

Where it All Began

Many point to nutritionists like Loren Cardain or Mark Disson as the founders of the Paleo Diet, but they would be the first tell you that it wasn’t “invented” at all, but rather taking us back to the diet of our progenitors. The real “inventors” of the Paleo Diet were our ancient ancestors: cavemen who lived off meat and greens.

Thomas Inch’s Diet

inch-lifting

One of the strongest men of the early twentieth-century, Thomas Inch was known in both Great Britain and the United States for his feats of strength. Unlike others however, Inch was hardly strict with his diet. In fact Inch was recorded as saying

There is nothing so wearisome as having to be extremely particular about what one eats or drinks. I can never believe that the food faddist is happy, that it can be nice to go through life feeling that it is extremely difficult to get the peculiar meals which have been adopted on some nature-cure plan, that everything has to be exact in quantity with nuts and fruit predominating.

The Lamb-chop and Pineapple Diet

dieta-de-pina-e1442862823424

Hollywood transformations have long been a subject of intense public scrutiny. From Christina Bale’s incredible body transformations for what seems like most of his movies to Charlize Theron’s weight gain for Monster, we the consumer have read in amazement at the lengths actors seem to go to in order to secure a part.

This, it would seem, is not a recent phenomena. Something that became clear to me recently as I read Heather Addison’s excellent monograph entitled Hollywood and the Rise of Physical Culture. Dealing primarily with the period 1910 to 1940, Addison showcases how both male and female stars of the age faced an almost daily struggle to keep and maintain a svelte physique.

One such technique was the ‘Lamb-Chop and Pineapple’ diet, the topic of today’s post which was favoured by many females actresses during the 1920s.

Guest Post: The Evolution of the Ketogenic Diet

2

If you’ve heard the buzzwords “keto,” “ketones” or “ketosis,” you may already be familiar with the Ketogenic diet. While it is more popular than ever today for those interested in losing weight and feeling satisfied, the diet was initially developed in response to epilepsy patients struggling to be free of ongoing and debilitating seizures.

Doctors and researchers discovered the power of fasting to reduce seizures long ago. Hippocrates, the legendary Greek physician who lived around 460 to 370 BC, was one of the first to report that fasting could ease epileptic seizures. Other doctors across the globe observed that it required two to three days of fasting to stop seizures, determining that a change in the body’s fuel triggered the shift.